space//time
phenomena
space//time
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shiki-sarreau:

Everyone talks so much about Frida, but never mentions Rigoberta Menchú.
Rigoberta Menchú was born on January 9, 1959 to a poor Indian peasant family and raised in the Quiche branch of the Mayan culture. In her early years she helped with the family farm work, either in the northern highlands where her family lived, or on the Pacific coast, where both adults and children went to pick coffee on the big plantations.Rigoberta Menchú soon became involved in social reform activities through the Catholic Church, and became prominent in the women’s rights movement when still only a teenager. Such reform work aroused considerable opposition in influential circles, especially after a guerilla organization established itself in the area. The Menchú family was accused of taking part in guerrilla activities and Rigoberta’s father, Vicente, was imprisoned and tortured for allegedly having participated in the execution of a local plantation owner. After his release, he joined the recently founded Committee of the Peasant Union (CUC).In 1979, Rigoberta, too, joined the CUC. That year her brother was arrested, tortured and killed by the army. The following year, her father was killed when security forces in the capital stormed the Spanish Embassy where he and some other peasants were staying. Shortly afterwards, her mother also died after having been arrested, tortured and raped. Rigoberta became increasingly active in the CUC, and taught herself Spanish as well as other Mayan languages than her native Quiche. In 1980, she figured prominently in a strike the CUC organized for better conditions for farm workers on the Pacific coast, and on May 1, 1981, she was active in large demonstrations in the capital. She joined the radical 31st of January Popular Front, in which her contribution chiefly consisted of educating the Indian peasant population in resistance to massive military oppression.In 1981, Rigoberta Menchú had to go into hiding in Guatemala, and then flee to Mexico. That marked the beginning of a new phase in her life: as the organizer abroad of resistance to oppression in Guatemala and the struggle for Indian peasant peoples’ rights. In 1982, she took part in the founding of the joint opposition body, The United Representation of the Guatemalan Opposition (RUOG). In 1983, she told her life story to Elisabeth Burgos Debray. The resulting book, called in English, I, Rigoberta Menchú, is a gripping human document which attracted considerable international attention. In 1986, Rigoberta Menchú became a member of the National Coordinating Committee of the CUC, and the following year she performed as the narrator in a powerful film called When the Mountains Tremble, about the struggles and sufferings of the Maya people. On at least three occasions, Rigoberta Menchú has returned to Guatemala to plead the cause of the Indian peasants, but death threats have forced her to return into exile.Over the years, Rigoberta Menchú has become widely known as a leading advocate of Indian rights and ethno-cultural reconciliation, not only in Guatemala but in the Western Hemisphere generally, and her work has earned her several international awards.
From Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 1992, Editor Tore Frängsmyr, [Nobel Foundation], Stockholm, 1993
This autobiography/biography was written at the time of the award and later published in the book series Les Prix Nobel/Nobel Lectures. The information is sometimes updated with an addendum submitted by the Laureate.
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heterogeneoushomosexual:

Wendy Red Star"Wendy Red Star was born in Billings, Montana just outside of the Crow Indian reservation where she was raised. She grew up in a multi-cultural family. Her mother is of Irish decent, her father a full blood Crow Indian and her older sister is Korean. Wendy left the Crow Indian reservation when she was eighteen to attend Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana where she studied sculpture. She then went on to earn her MFA in sculpture at UCLA. Wendy currently lives in Portland, Oregon where she is an adjunct professor of art at Portland State University.
Wendy Red Star’s work explores the intersection between life on the Crow Indian reservation and the world outside of that environment. She thinks of herself as a Crow Indian cultural archivist speaking sincerely about the experience of being a Crow Indian in contemporary society.”http://www.bockleygallery.com/artist_red_star/index.html_____________________________.
heterogeneoushomosexual:

Wendy Red Star"Wendy Red Star was born in Billings, Montana just outside of the Crow Indian reservation where she was raised. She grew up in a multi-cultural family. Her mother is of Irish decent, her father a full blood Crow Indian and her older sister is Korean. Wendy left the Crow Indian reservation when she was eighteen to attend Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana where she studied sculpture. She then went on to earn her MFA in sculpture at UCLA. Wendy currently lives in Portland, Oregon where she is an adjunct professor of art at Portland State University.
Wendy Red Star’s work explores the intersection between life on the Crow Indian reservation and the world outside of that environment. She thinks of herself as a Crow Indian cultural archivist speaking sincerely about the experience of being a Crow Indian in contemporary society.”http://www.bockleygallery.com/artist_red_star/index.html_____________________________.
heterogeneoushomosexual:

Wendy Red Star"Wendy Red Star was born in Billings, Montana just outside of the Crow Indian reservation where she was raised. She grew up in a multi-cultural family. Her mother is of Irish decent, her father a full blood Crow Indian and her older sister is Korean. Wendy left the Crow Indian reservation when she was eighteen to attend Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana where she studied sculpture. She then went on to earn her MFA in sculpture at UCLA. Wendy currently lives in Portland, Oregon where she is an adjunct professor of art at Portland State University.
Wendy Red Star’s work explores the intersection between life on the Crow Indian reservation and the world outside of that environment. She thinks of herself as a Crow Indian cultural archivist speaking sincerely about the experience of being a Crow Indian in contemporary society.”http://www.bockleygallery.com/artist_red_star/index.html_____________________________.
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fidenciomartinez:

elmuseo:

artintersections:

Fidencio Martinez is a mixed-media artist based in Memphis, Tennessee, who uses paint and cut paper to “examine the brown body, the battleground onto which events, perceptions and laws are formed.” He is the recipient of the 2013 Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Fellowship Award.

#BADASSARTIST
For more of his work, go to http://www.fidenciomartinez.com/

" #badassartist " I love it.Instragram - artistfidencio
fidenciomartinez:

elmuseo:

artintersections:

Fidencio Martinez is a mixed-media artist based in Memphis, Tennessee, who uses paint and cut paper to “examine the brown body, the battleground onto which events, perceptions and laws are formed.” He is the recipient of the 2013 Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Fellowship Award.

#BADASSARTIST
For more of his work, go to http://www.fidenciomartinez.com/

" #badassartist " I love it.Instragram - artistfidencio
fidenciomartinez:

elmuseo:

artintersections:

Fidencio Martinez is a mixed-media artist based in Memphis, Tennessee, who uses paint and cut paper to “examine the brown body, the battleground onto which events, perceptions and laws are formed.” He is the recipient of the 2013 Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Fellowship Award.

#BADASSARTIST
For more of his work, go to http://www.fidenciomartinez.com/

" #badassartist " I love it.Instragram - artistfidencio
fidenciomartinez:

elmuseo:

artintersections:

Fidencio Martinez is a mixed-media artist based in Memphis, Tennessee, who uses paint and cut paper to “examine the brown body, the battleground onto which events, perceptions and laws are formed.” He is the recipient of the 2013 Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Fellowship Award.

#BADASSARTIST
For more of his work, go to http://www.fidenciomartinez.com/

" #badassartist " I love it.Instragram - artistfidencio
fidenciomartinez:

elmuseo:

artintersections:

Fidencio Martinez is a mixed-media artist based in Memphis, Tennessee, who uses paint and cut paper to “examine the brown body, the battleground onto which events, perceptions and laws are formed.” He is the recipient of the 2013 Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Fellowship Award.

#BADASSARTIST
For more of his work, go to http://www.fidenciomartinez.com/

" #badassartist " I love it.Instragram - artistfidencio
fidenciomartinez:

elmuseo:

artintersections:

Fidencio Martinez is a mixed-media artist based in Memphis, Tennessee, who uses paint and cut paper to “examine the brown body, the battleground onto which events, perceptions and laws are formed.” He is the recipient of the 2013 Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Fellowship Award.

#BADASSARTIST
For more of his work, go to http://www.fidenciomartinez.com/

" #badassartist " I love it.Instragram - artistfidencio
fidenciomartinez:

elmuseo:

artintersections:

Fidencio Martinez is a mixed-media artist based in Memphis, Tennessee, who uses paint and cut paper to “examine the brown body, the battleground onto which events, perceptions and laws are formed.” He is the recipient of the 2013 Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Fellowship Award.

#BADASSARTIST
For more of his work, go to http://www.fidenciomartinez.com/

" #badassartist " I love it.Instragram - artistfidencio
fidenciomartinez:

elmuseo:

artintersections:

Fidencio Martinez is a mixed-media artist based in Memphis, Tennessee, who uses paint and cut paper to “examine the brown body, the battleground onto which events, perceptions and laws are formed.” He is the recipient of the 2013 Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Fellowship Award.

#BADASSARTIST
For more of his work, go to http://www.fidenciomartinez.com/

" #badassartist " I love it.Instragram - artistfidencio
fidenciomartinez:

elmuseo:

artintersections:

Fidencio Martinez is a mixed-media artist based in Memphis, Tennessee, who uses paint and cut paper to “examine the brown body, the battleground onto which events, perceptions and laws are formed.” He is the recipient of the 2013 Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Fellowship Award.

#BADASSARTIST
For more of his work, go to http://www.fidenciomartinez.com/

" #badassartist " I love it.Instragram - artistfidencio
fidenciomartinez:

elmuseo:

artintersections:

Fidencio Martinez is a mixed-media artist based in Memphis, Tennessee, who uses paint and cut paper to “examine the brown body, the battleground onto which events, perceptions and laws are formed.” He is the recipient of the 2013 Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Fellowship Award.

#BADASSARTIST
For more of his work, go to http://www.fidenciomartinez.com/

" #badassartist " I love it.Instragram - artistfidencio
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thevintagethimble:

Headdress circa 1920. Thailand (possibly Cambodia). Glass, Gilt Lacquer & Silver Dancer’s Headdress for Sita. 

Dance dramas such as Thai versions of the Rama epic featuring Hanuman, king or the monkeys, Rama, and Sita, were very popular in the Kingdom of Siam in 
the 19th and early 20th centuries. Headdresses such as this particularly fine example were made for the dancer who played the key role of Sita. As heroine of 
the epic, she, like Rama, were attired regally with ornate costumes and spectacular crown-like headdresses. Lower ranking females such as princesses wore 
diadems rather than full crowns with tiered spires.

This headdress comprises gilded lacquer, black lacquer, wood, rawhide, faceted glass spangles, and silver. The glass spangles are mounted in a jour silver 
settings, in complex bands of silver wire, and with many mounted in flower-like settings en tremble on wire stems so that the spangles shimmied and moved in 
a frenetic and over-exaggerated fashion with any minor movement made by the dancer. The silver settings are particularly fine.

The crown incorporates a diadem with gilded rawhide flanges or wings that frame the dancer’s face on either side and which are embellished with fine wire 
netting inset with dozens of silver-mounted glass spangles.

Before the dancers performed, it was traditional for them to place their headdresses, diadems, masks and musical instruments on an altar along with offerings 
to respected teachers and spirits. After the ceremony, the headdresses were put on and a small, single fresh flower was tucked behind the ear (McGill, 2009, 
p. 108). |  Michael Backman
thevintagethimble:

Headdress circa 1920. Thailand (possibly Cambodia). Glass, Gilt Lacquer & Silver Dancer’s Headdress for Sita. 

Dance dramas such as Thai versions of the Rama epic featuring Hanuman, king or the monkeys, Rama, and Sita, were very popular in the Kingdom of Siam in 
the 19th and early 20th centuries. Headdresses such as this particularly fine example were made for the dancer who played the key role of Sita. As heroine of 
the epic, she, like Rama, were attired regally with ornate costumes and spectacular crown-like headdresses. Lower ranking females such as princesses wore 
diadems rather than full crowns with tiered spires.

This headdress comprises gilded lacquer, black lacquer, wood, rawhide, faceted glass spangles, and silver. The glass spangles are mounted in a jour silver 
settings, in complex bands of silver wire, and with many mounted in flower-like settings en tremble on wire stems so that the spangles shimmied and moved in 
a frenetic and over-exaggerated fashion with any minor movement made by the dancer. The silver settings are particularly fine.

The crown incorporates a diadem with gilded rawhide flanges or wings that frame the dancer’s face on either side and which are embellished with fine wire 
netting inset with dozens of silver-mounted glass spangles.

Before the dancers performed, it was traditional for them to place their headdresses, diadems, masks and musical instruments on an altar along with offerings 
to respected teachers and spirits. After the ceremony, the headdresses were put on and a small, single fresh flower was tucked behind the ear (McGill, 2009, 
p. 108). |  Michael Backman
thevintagethimble:

Headdress circa 1920. Thailand (possibly Cambodia). Glass, Gilt Lacquer & Silver Dancer’s Headdress for Sita. 

Dance dramas such as Thai versions of the Rama epic featuring Hanuman, king or the monkeys, Rama, and Sita, were very popular in the Kingdom of Siam in 
the 19th and early 20th centuries. Headdresses such as this particularly fine example were made for the dancer who played the key role of Sita. As heroine of 
the epic, she, like Rama, were attired regally with ornate costumes and spectacular crown-like headdresses. Lower ranking females such as princesses wore 
diadems rather than full crowns with tiered spires.

This headdress comprises gilded lacquer, black lacquer, wood, rawhide, faceted glass spangles, and silver. The glass spangles are mounted in a jour silver 
settings, in complex bands of silver wire, and with many mounted in flower-like settings en tremble on wire stems so that the spangles shimmied and moved in 
a frenetic and over-exaggerated fashion with any minor movement made by the dancer. The silver settings are particularly fine.

The crown incorporates a diadem with gilded rawhide flanges or wings that frame the dancer’s face on either side and which are embellished with fine wire 
netting inset with dozens of silver-mounted glass spangles.

Before the dancers performed, it was traditional for them to place their headdresses, diadems, masks and musical instruments on an altar along with offerings 
to respected teachers and spirits. After the ceremony, the headdresses were put on and a small, single fresh flower was tucked behind the ear (McGill, 2009, 
p. 108). |  Michael Backman
thevintagethimble:

Headdress circa 1920. Thailand (possibly Cambodia). Glass, Gilt Lacquer & Silver Dancer’s Headdress for Sita. 

Dance dramas such as Thai versions of the Rama epic featuring Hanuman, king or the monkeys, Rama, and Sita, were very popular in the Kingdom of Siam in 
the 19th and early 20th centuries. Headdresses such as this particularly fine example were made for the dancer who played the key role of Sita. As heroine of 
the epic, she, like Rama, were attired regally with ornate costumes and spectacular crown-like headdresses. Lower ranking females such as princesses wore 
diadems rather than full crowns with tiered spires.

This headdress comprises gilded lacquer, black lacquer, wood, rawhide, faceted glass spangles, and silver. The glass spangles are mounted in a jour silver 
settings, in complex bands of silver wire, and with many mounted in flower-like settings en tremble on wire stems so that the spangles shimmied and moved in 
a frenetic and over-exaggerated fashion with any minor movement made by the dancer. The silver settings are particularly fine.

The crown incorporates a diadem with gilded rawhide flanges or wings that frame the dancer’s face on either side and which are embellished with fine wire 
netting inset with dozens of silver-mounted glass spangles.

Before the dancers performed, it was traditional for them to place their headdresses, diadems, masks and musical instruments on an altar along with offerings 
to respected teachers and spirits. After the ceremony, the headdresses were put on and a small, single fresh flower was tucked behind the ear (McGill, 2009, 
p. 108). |  Michael Backman
thevintagethimble:

Headdress circa 1920. Thailand (possibly Cambodia). Glass, Gilt Lacquer & Silver Dancer’s Headdress for Sita. 

Dance dramas such as Thai versions of the Rama epic featuring Hanuman, king or the monkeys, Rama, and Sita, were very popular in the Kingdom of Siam in 
the 19th and early 20th centuries. Headdresses such as this particularly fine example were made for the dancer who played the key role of Sita. As heroine of 
the epic, she, like Rama, were attired regally with ornate costumes and spectacular crown-like headdresses. Lower ranking females such as princesses wore 
diadems rather than full crowns with tiered spires.

This headdress comprises gilded lacquer, black lacquer, wood, rawhide, faceted glass spangles, and silver. The glass spangles are mounted in a jour silver 
settings, in complex bands of silver wire, and with many mounted in flower-like settings en tremble on wire stems so that the spangles shimmied and moved in 
a frenetic and over-exaggerated fashion with any minor movement made by the dancer. The silver settings are particularly fine.

The crown incorporates a diadem with gilded rawhide flanges or wings that frame the dancer’s face on either side and which are embellished with fine wire 
netting inset with dozens of silver-mounted glass spangles.

Before the dancers performed, it was traditional for them to place their headdresses, diadems, masks and musical instruments on an altar along with offerings 
to respected teachers and spirits. After the ceremony, the headdresses were put on and a small, single fresh flower was tucked behind the ear (McGill, 2009, 
p. 108). |  Michael Backman
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m-e-s-t-i-z-a:

brazilwonders:

Considerado um dos mais importantes escritores do século 20 e um dos mais renomados autores latinos da história, o escritor colombiano Gabriel García Marquez morreu nesta quinta-feira (17).
Marquez recebeu o Prêmio Nobel de Literatura em 1982 pelo conjunto de sua obra. Foi o primeiro colombiano e quarto latino-americano a receber o prêmio, e, na ocasião, agradeceu com um discurso intitulado “A solidão da América Latina” 
"Cara a cara com esta realidade horrenda que pode ter parecido uma mera utopia em toda a existência humana, nós, os inventores das fábulas, que acreditamos em qualquer coisa, nos sentimos inclinados a acreditar que ainda não é tarde demais para nos engajarmos na criação da utopia oposta.
Uma nova e avassaladora utopia da vida, onde ninguém será capaz de decidir como os outros morrerão, onde o amor provará que a verdade e a felicidade serão possíveis, e onde as raças condenadas a cem anos de solidão terão, finalmente e para sempre, uma segunda oportunidade sobre a terra. “ - Trecho do seu discurso ao vencer o Nobel de Literatura em 1982.

estoy tan triste
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"Before I give my body, I must give my thoughts, my mind, my dreams. And you weren’t having any of those."
Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath (via theimperfectideal)
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